Satisfaction Survey, Focus Group or Both?

MDG_NAR Chicago Eblast_10 2017_Does Your Association Value Prop Stick-

Know thy member. Understanding the evolving needs of members and identifying gaps to align your strategic plan is imperative. Where to allocate budgets, what programs to focus on and how to prioritize scarce staff resources. So what’s the best course of action? Should you conduct a member needs assessment or invest in a focus group? Or both? Consider the following:

MEMBER SURVEYS

The biggest pros:

  • Online surveys are very efficient
  • The data does not lie
  • It’s a scanning exercise that leads to planning
  • It’s objective

Don’t assume you know what members are thinking – focus on the facts. Surveys capture contemporary feedback from wide audience segments with concrete results that can be analyzed and presented to your Board.

For next year or the next three years, these can provide an excellent, objective backdrop to strategically plan:

  • Insights into member value (what’s valuable)
  • Behavior (what do they use)
  • Communication preferences (which channels and how often)

This is a critical management step to determine how to drive engagement and value through your association’s programs and services.

“McKenna Group’s work on our member survey was vital to the creation of our new marketing plan.  We now have a much better understanding of the value that we provide our membership and the best way to structure our value proposition.”

Bill Head
Director of Communications
MetroTex Association of REALTORS®

FOCUS GROUPS

Why conduct a focus group?

  • Dig deeper into the minds of your members
  • Allow key stakeholders to share first-hand perspectives and feedback on a variety of high-level topics: your association’s programs, services and delivery channels

Being able to ask follow-up questions and read body language can be vital to getting the truth on how members feel about current and future programming. It’s critical to have the CSE (chief staff executive) and CEO (chief elected officer) help to steward the process to invite attendees but no ask questions directly.

Hiring a third-party facilitator often provides the necessary “let your hair down” atmosphere to hear members’ blunt input and probe deeper. A recapping deliverable is often helpful to provide CSE and Board insights and member preferences. This can become the bedrock for strategic planning efforts and keeps the Board thinking strategically and engaged.

McKenna Design GroupMDG_NAR Chicago Eblast_10 2017_or both_Member Survey Circle

With over 15 years of experience in the real estate industry, McKenna Design Group supports scanning, planning and implementing a wide range of association solutions including:

  • Satisfaction surveys
  • Successful focus groups
  • Strategic planning
  • Increased member engagement

The best solution is catered to the specific needs of your association and goals of your Board. Contact MDG.

How Content Hierarchy Could Have Saved The Oscars

HOLLYWOOD, CA - FEBRUARY 26: Detail shot as 'La La Land' producer Jordan Horowitz holds up the winner card reading actual Best Picture winner 'Moonlight' onstage during the 89th Annual Academy Awards at Hollywood & Highland Center on February 26, 2017 in Hollywood, California. (Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images)

The awkward Best Picture announcement at the Oscars Sunday could have been avoided. Regardless of how Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway got ahold of the wrong envelope. The horrible user experience that followed was unnecessary. Presenters should be able to tell the category through even a glance. Thanks to weak typography and illogical hierarchy the wrong winner was declared amid confusion.

The All-Powerful Hierarchy

Best practices of content hierarchy ensure accuracy and a much better user experience for the presenters and the winners. Legibility, scan-ability and readability are all hot buttons when we design. Here’s how we’d redesign the card:

  1. The award name is at the bottom, tiny and oblique. Easily missed, as evidenced by Beatty’s confusion on stage. We moved the name of the award to the top of the card in large, all caps type. Beatty would have immediately known that he had the wrong envelope and the La La Land/Moonlight debacle would not have occurred.
  2. The winning name is too small and blends in with the subhead. We differentiated the two pieces of information by using all caps and bold type on the primary winner and smaller, lowercase for the other information.
  3. The use of the Oscars Logo at the top of the card (the largest element!) is an unnecessary waste of space. The logo can stand strong, smaller at the bottom of the card.

Oscars Card Redesign

This mistake is reminiscent of the “hanging chad” issue from 2000. The artistry of excellent design is transparent. Like Shakespeare’s negative capability, well designed work brings the message to the forefront. Good design is good business.

#McKennaDesignGroup #Oscars #GoodDesignisGoodBusiness #MDG15thHour

McKenna Design Group is a full-service marketing communications and technology firm in Chicago. Hire us and we'll develop integrated, results-driven solutions. Our promise? Return on Experience.® We build a brand so customers advocate for you.

GSA NAICS Codes 541430, 541511, 541613, 541810, 541910